Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin’s College Admissions Scam: Everything We Know_1


The aftermath of Operation Variety Blues is far from over.

Actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among dozens of people named and charged in a college admissions scam on March 12. The American Crime star, for her part, was accused of paying $15,000 to William Rick Singer’s fake charity to help her eldest daughter, Sophia, cheat on the SATs. According to CNN, Singer traveled from Florida to West Hollywood to administer Sophia's exam. She reportedly scored 400 points higher the second time.

Huffman, who pleaded guilty to fraud charges, apologized after she was sentenced to 14 days in prison.

“I accept the court’s decision today without reservation. I have always been prepared to accept whatever punishment Judge Talwani imposed. I broke the law. I have admitted that and I pleaded guilty to this crime. There are no excuses or justifications for my actions. Period,” Huffman said. “I would like to apologize to my daughter, my husband, my family and the educational community for my actions. And I especially want to apologize to the students who work hard every day to get into college, and to their parents who make tremendous sacrifices supporting their children.”

She added: “I can promise you that in the months and years to come that I will try and live a more honest life, serve as a better role model for my daughters and family and continue to contribute my time and energies wherever I am needed.”

Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, meanwhile, allegedly paid bribes to ensure their two daughters, Bella and Olivia Jade, would be recruited as a part of the University of Southern California crew team, even though the girls do not participate in crew.

"I wanted to thank you again for your great work with [our daughter], she is very excited and both Lori and I are very appreciative of your efforts and end result!" Giannulli allegedly emailed Singer, per CNN.

The couple pleaded not guilty to fraud and money laundering charges in April.

As #CollegeCheatingScandal continues to trend, scroll through for everything we know about the scam — so far: